HPC: INFO & NAVIGATION

PIANO TIMELINE

History Of The Piano

Tracing the roots of the piano to the very beginning of consciousness, when man first became aware of sound.

LIST
1792, Rossini
1795, Marx

1794, Moscheles

Portrait of Ignaz Moscheles by Godefroy Engelmann and Pierre Roch Vigneron, c. 1820 – 1840.
Portrait of Ignaz Moscheles by Godefroy Engelmann and Pierre Roch Vigneron, c. 1820 – 1840. 1

Ignaz Moscheles (1794 – 1870): Prague Born Pianist, Conductor, Composer, Teacher – Late Classical / Early Romantic Period

  • Studied piano at a young age and was taught by B. D. Weber, director of the Prague Conservatory from 1804 - 1808.
  • In 1808, moved to Vienna to be more connected to his musical idol Beethoven, as he felt: “Beethoven is great—whom should I call greater?” There, studied under Johann Georg Albrechtsberger (1736 – 1809) and Antonio Salieri (1750 – 1825).
  • Circa 1814, Beethoven asked him to create the piano arrangement for his opera Fidelio.
  • Became conductor and eventually co-director of the Royal Philharmonic Society.
  • “Teaching was a central part of Moscheles’ career from his early years in Vienna until his death in Leipzig in 1870. The list of Moscheles’ students […] is long and impressive. For example, Moscheles calculated that in just one year, 1835, he had given in London ‘1457 lessons, of which 1328 were paid, and 129 gratis.’ If one […] extrapolates this to a teaching career of fifty years, the numbers are truly staggering.” [ 2 ]
  • Taught at the London Royal Academy of Music and Leipzig Conservatory, as well as private lessons and other cities.
  • Some of his pupils: Camille Pleyel, Sigismond Thalberg, and Felix Mendelssohn.
  • In his work Method of Methods (Méthode des Méthodes) (1839/1840) co-written with Francis Joseph Fétis, Moscheles articulates on piano technique, music theory and “a wide sampling of views, opinions and approaches to the piano and its literature from most of the major teachers of the era.” [ 3 ]

Page Sources

SOURCES
[ CLOSE ]
 
[1]
Mu.  "Portrait of Ignaz Moscheles by Godefroy Engelmann and Pierre Roch Vigneron, c. 1820 – 1840."  Scan.  Located in the New York Public Library’s Digital Gallery, New York.  Commons Wikimedia.  Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., 1 March 2011.  Web.  9 Oct. 2015.  Public Domain.
[2]
Kroll, Mark.  Ignaz Moscheles and the Changing World of Musical Europe.  Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 2014: pg. 166.  Google Books.  Web.  16 Sept. 2015.
[3]
Kroll, Mark.  Ignaz Moscheles and the Changing World of Musical Europe.  Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 2014: pg. 192.  Google Books.  Web.  16 Sept. 2015.
Additional References:
  • Chambers, Jr., Robert W.  "Ignaz Moscheles (1794-1870)."  Moscheles.  Moscheles, 2004.  Web.  16 Sept. 2016.
End of Article